Congenital breast abnormalities include a series of anomalies that appear during puberty when the breasts develop (for men, see the gynecomastia section). They are often the source of functional discomfort and complexes. Here are the most common:

Breast asymetry

Breast asymmetry describes a situation where one breast is much smaller than the other. Some asymmetry correction surgeries are covered by the RAMQ, notably when the difference in volume between the two breasts exceeds 150 grams. The intervention can be performed when breast development has stopped, between the ages of 16 and 18.

“Note: These photos are published for information purposes only in order to provide information on the nature of the intervention. In no way should they be considered a guarantee of results.”

 

Intervention

Different techniques can be used to make the breasts symmetrical, including reduction, mastopexy and the use of breast implants. The intervention, which takes 1½ to 2½ hours, is performed under general anaesthesia.

 

Convalescence

  • The dressings will be removed during the postoperative visit, 5 to 10 days following the surgery. There will be swelling and bruising on the breasts for about 2 weeks. Although healing occurs during the 3 months following the surgery, the results will be final only when a year has passed. As for the appearance of the scars, they will be red for two months, then will turn white gradually over the next 12 months. To improve their appearance, it will be suggested to apply vitamin E three times a day starting the fourth week.
  • It will be recommended to sleep in a semi-upright position for 2 to 4 weeks and to avoid wearing underwire bras for 6 weeks.
  • You can usually return to work 1 to 2 weeks after the procedure if you have a desk job, but if you do physical work, you will have to wait longer (up to 4 weeks).
  • Wait 3 weeks before engaging in cardiovascular activities, 4 weeks for sports activities and 6 weeks for contact sports.

 

Tuberous breasts

At puberty, the mammary gland may develop without the skin stretching enough. The breast develops a cylindrical shape and seems deformed. The inframammary fold is often too high and the nipple is abnormally big.

Depending on the severity of the case, two interventions could possibly be necessary to correct tuberous breasts: during the first, a mastopexy will be performed and during the second, a breast implant will be inserted. If two surgeries are necessary, there must be a 6-week to 3-month interval between the two. 

Some reconstruction surgeries are covered by the RAMQ. During your consultation, Dr. Bergeron will advise you on which solution is most appropriate for your situation. You will also be able to look at photos of patients who have had tuberous breast reconstruction surgery.

 

Intervention

The surgery, which takes 1 to 2 hours, is performed under general anaesthesia. The surgical treatment consists first of correcting the morphological abnormality by reducing and lifting the areola and lowering the inframammary segment in order to position it correctly. A breast implant is used to give the breast volume. Fat transfer (by injection) can also be used in severe cases.

 

Convalescence

  • The dressings will be removed during the postoperative visit, 5 to 10 days following the surgery. There will be swelling and bruising on the breasts for about 2 weeks. Although healing occurs during the 3 months following the surgery, the results will be final only when a year has passed. As for the appearance of the scars, they will be red for two months, then will turn white gradually over the next 12 months. To improve their appearance, it will be suggested to apply vitamin E three times a day starting the fourth week.
  • It will be recommended to sleep in a semi-upright position for 2 to 4 weeks and to avoid wearing underwire bras for 6 weeks.
  • You can usually return to work 1 to 2 weeks after the procedure if you have a desk job, but if you do physical work, you will have to wait longer (up to 4 weeks).
  • Wait 3 weeks before engaging in cardiovascular activities, 4 weeks for sports activities and 6 weeks for contact sports.

 

 


 

 

Poland’s Syndrome

Poland’s syndrome is a congenital malformation characterized by a lack of development of the pectoralis major muscle. Sometimes there is also a lack of breast development, a malformation of the thorax and/or of the homolateral upper limb.

Poland’s Syndrome affects twice as many men as women. Treatment consists of corrective surgery. However, it is important to understand that the treatment, when performed in the chest area, is solely cosmetic in nature, not functional.

 

Intervention

During the initial surgery, a tissue expander will be used to gradually stretch the skin over a 2- to 3-month period. Saline water will be injected into the expander each week to give it the desired volume. During the second surgery, the expander will be removed and a permanent breast implant will be installed. Lipofilling may be used to help define the breast.

 

Convalescence

  • The dressings will be removed during the postoperative visit, 5 to 10 days following the operation.
  • Following the second intervention, there will be swelling and bruising on the breasts for about 2 weeks. Although healing occurs during the 3 months following the surgery, the results will be final only after a year has passed. As for the appearance of the scars, they will be red for two months, then will gradually turn white over the next 12 months. To improve their appearance, it will be suggested to apply vitamin E three times a day starting the fourth week.
  • It will be recommended to sleep in a semi-upright position for 2 to 4 weeks and to avoid underwire bras for 6 weeks.
  • You can usually return to work 1 to 2 weeks after the procedure if you have a desk job, but if you do physical work, you will have to wait longer (up to 4 weeks).
  • Wait 3 weeks before engaging in cardiovascular activities, 4 weeks for sports activities and 6 weeks for contact sports.